The Folly of Greed

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Proverbs 1:19 (NKJV) – “So are the ways of everyone who is greedy for gain; It takes away the life of its owners.”

The year 1987 gave us an Oliver Stone classic that did an amazing job of capturing the psyche of corporate America, that still rings true even today. Gordon Gekko, while a purely fictitious character in the film Wallstreet, delivered an immortal mantra still standing firm within our culture.

“Greed…is good.”

We see it everyday, everywhere we look. The Smiths down the street buy a new car and suddenly we begin to question our own seven-year old minivan. Mr. Jones was given a promotion for the successful completion of a project, and suddenly Mr. Ivy decides he needs to work more overtime to keep up. The Drake family plans to embark on a 5-day cruise, and suddenly Mrs. Banks resents having to pinch and spend every dime on her large family, just to make ends meet.

People will literally work themselves to death, in the pursuit of more stuff. Sometimes we never seem to have enough. The chase for more can, and often does, take a toll on a person’s Spiritual well-being. We choose to work more hours to get ahead, and in the process lower our personal standards on the time we spend with God. Maybe we cut God out of our lives completely in an effort to chase riches and comfort.

King Solomon knew this was folly, even back in his own time. In the context of the verse, Solomon was speaking a warning against partnering with shady characters. But, he knew enough about the dangers of greed to pray for wisdom and understanding of God’s law, without asking for material securities. As a result of the condition of his heart, God rewarded him with the very riches and securities Solomon didn’t ask for. The king put God first in his own heart. Often, this is just not so with the rich.

Greed is like an unquenchable fire. One has to keep stoking the flames to keep the fire burning because it’s never satisfied. Millionaires, superstar athletes, entertainers, businessmen die unhappy and broken people every day. Their wealth does not equate to happiness. In many cases, the wealth equates to short lives. It must be an enormous amount of pressure to be able to juggle and sustain the type of lifestyle that continuously chases after more than yesterday; last week; last month; last year. The quest to fulfill greed sucks the life right out of people.

Jesus taught we cannot serve both God and manna (money). We will either serve one or the other. I’m learning to be content with whatever roll or situation the Lord keeps me in, and to trust that His ways and guidance are for my ultimate good. Contrary to popular belief, greed is bad.

 

 

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